Stay

Stay with us

A day trip may be all very well, but to really feel and understand all we have to offer, you need to stay in one of the fabulous and varied accommodations that are available on Arran.

You may find hotels with views of hills, campsites in glens, stunning cottages with boats as roofs, bed and breakfasts overlooking overlooking the sea, or glamping sites on magical moors.

Many hosts take dogs, and offer accessible accommodation and facilities.

From basic campsites to high end luxury lodges, bed & breakfasts and hotels, we have accommodation available to suit every need and every budget. Use the accommodation search categories below for inspiration.


FOR LATEST AVAILABILITY

For online accommodation availability please click here for B&B and self catering, and here for hotels. 

When to visit?

The isle of Arran, really is a year-round destination. Yes, some seasons are drier and sunnier than others, but that shouldn't stop you making the most of all seasons. You'll be surprised what island-life can offer you!


Spring - March, April, May

Visit Arran in Springtime as the fresh April showers wash away the winter snow and the lush greens start to appear. It’s like the island is reborn and the whole island buzzes with activity in preparation for the summer. Spring is also peak breeding season for wildlife and for farmlife too, so do be aware and keep your distance – and remember to always keep your dog on a lead.

Easter of course is the time to see lambs gambolling and newly hatched chicks finding their way in farmyards. In May you can take part the Arran Mountain Festival, and if you fancy it, the Goatfell Hill race also takes place.

Spring is like the Arran Sense of Scotland signature scent – because it is like ‘after the rain’!


Summer - June, July, August

Summertime on Arran is known locally as the ‘busy season’. Flowerbeds bust with colour, and heather offers a purple tint to the hills. This is the time of year when there’s loads of activities and events on offer, so try your hand at kayaking – or visit a village fete.

The wildlife is plentiful as the young of Spring settle into their new lives. Be sure and keep an eye out for dolphin and porpoise around the shoreline, and whilst you’re there, take a dip in the clear seawater yourself! Key events are Arran Farmers’ Show and Brodick Highland Games. These events are both held in August and have been going for hundreds of years (literally). Arran Open Studios is a great weekend event in August too.


Autumn - September, October, November

The Autumn colours on the hills offer golden russets, and bright oranges as nature switches the palette over from Summer. This is a lovely time to visit, quieter but still with plenty of options, and weather can remain warm well into September. Many islanders take a well-deserved fortnight’s holiday in October – not the stags though; they’re in rut! Most attractions remain open until the end of the month.

Key events would be the McLellen Festival, held annually in September, this arts festival celebrates the life of the renowned Scots Playwright Robert McLellan who lived at High Corrie. There’s a wide variety of activities to engage with. Santa’s Sparkle takes place the last weekend in November – in preparation for the jolly red-coated man visiting Arran!


Winter - December, January, February

Winter on Arran will show snow capped hills, framed by a range of rich brown lower slopes. This is a perfect time to get to one with nature and get your walking boots on. If it’s peace and quiet you desire this is the time to visit. Some of the activity providers remain open, but the island is generally less busy.

More visitors will arrive over Christmas and New Year – be sure and pop over to Shiskine Valley in the evening for ‘Shiskine Shines’. This is where all the villagers put up their own outdoor Christmas lights and they increase week on week throughout December.

January is often the time that some of the businesses close for a wee while for renovations – so do check before you come to make sure you’re not disappointed.

 

 

Quirky Island Fact

#18 - The site of Brodick Castle has been used since the 5th C when it was a fortress.
Brodick Castle’s history goes way back before the Dukes of Hamilton used it as a shooting lodge. In fact they didn’t take over until 1470s. It was then rebuilt as a tower house, and the castle as we know it now was actually an addition built in 1840s by Princess Marie of Baden when she married the 11th Duke.

Quirky Island Fact

#18 - The site of Brodick Castle has been used since the 5th C when it was a fortress.
Brodick Castle’s history goes way back before the Dukes of Hamilton used it as a shooting lodge. In fact they didn’t take over until 1470s. It was then rebuilt as a tower house, and the castle as we know it now was actually an addition built in 1840s by Princess Marie of Baden when she married the 11th Duke.

Quirky Island Fact

#18 - The site of Brodick Castle has been used since the 5th C when it was a fortress.
Brodick Castle’s history goes way back before the Dukes of Hamilton used it as a shooting lodge. In fact they didn’t take over until 1470s. It was then rebuilt as a tower house, and the castle as we know it now was actually an addition built in 1840s by Princess Marie of Baden when she married the 11th Duke.